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things that happens while kennedy is alive that has a very important impact on foreign policy is the assassination of the president of south vietnam. our client, our ally over there. and then two weeks later, i think it's two weeks later, kennedy is himself assassinated. and as you were saying before, this raised the questions that historians can argue about, keep arguing about, the next 50 years, would kennedy have wanted to -- would he have pulled american troops out of vietnam dish pull adviseers out, and you -- indications are that he would have and you cite various sources.that. just curious, just to challenge that a little bit, there's a wonderful book by a diploma called, "choosing war" in which he says that viet cong attacks were doubling in november from the month above in south vietnam. and that there were meetings of kennedy's top advicers in honolulu, which is -- which i think finished up the day before kennedy was assassinated -- a great film -- and they warn the viet cong is going to win if the u.s. didn't do something very quickly. so, not to challenge the memor
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time to think that you could fix and watch with a hammer. yeah, so we did. we went on the road and in many ways had our faith in the american process and our country restored by meeting some wonderful, committed people, who really mean extremely well and have the future of this country in their hearts and minds. but we raised the better part of $10 million, and it ain't right, you know? i do not know a lot about election reform, but it seems it breaks into two areas. one is the campaign and the other is the actual election itself. fixing the campaign is going to be tough, trying to get the money out of it, trying to get some forms in the place of our debates that actually give us a clear idea of who the candidate is and what they intend for the country -- that is a difficult and tall order. trying to streamline it so that it does not take two years to run for public office. these are difficult things to accomplish, and i do not know how we go about it. it seems as though there is a sign of election reform, the process itself,
? >> so in fact it very important to our foreign policy and we're exporting our way of thinking of intellectual property. >> this is treasury secretary tim geithner slamming china on exactly this. >> we're seeing china continue to be very, very aggressive in a tragedy that they started decades ago which goes like this, we want you to tell to our country, we want you to come produce here. if you want to come produce here, we want to you export from china. if you want to come to produce here, you need to transfer your technology to us. and they have made possible systematic stealing of intellectual property of american companies and have not been aggressive in putting in the protection for the intellectual property that everyone needs. >> this is one of the big objectives is making sure that there are legal agreements in place that are going to export our intellectual property regime. >> right. and economic espionage is something that could be draining america of economy. what i'm trying to get is a balance between the public access and the investors incentive and that's where we'
to see repeated. >> let me ask you about a couple of foreign policy notes. after the attack in benghazi, is there a need for more accountability this doesn't happen again and do you know who was behind the attack at this point? >> two points. number one, i think tom pickrick and mike mullen who headed up the review board did a very thorough job in identifying what were some severe problems in diplomatic security. and they provided us with a series of recommendations. many of them were already starting to be implemented. secretary clinton has indicated that she is going to implement all of them. what i -- my message to the state department has been very simple. and that is we're going to solve this. we're not going to be defensive about it. we're no pretend that this was not a problem. this was a huge problem and we're going to implement every single recommendation that's been put forward. some individuals have been held accountable inside of the state department and what i've said is that we are going to fix this to make sure this does not happen again because these are folks that i sen
the bureau and employees there in an emergency. my foreign policy summit is to be there when there are emergencies around the world. i have colleagues i grew up with, judy woodruff has three children, including a child with special needs. compton has four children. producers are having children and coming back. our top producer is married to someone on the hill with two kids at home. she travels with the president all the time. there are ways. corporations are much more flexible in broadcasting now. alexander wallace, one of our top executives, ann curry with family. it can be done. it involves a lot of tough tradeoffs. our corporate culture ought to be more forgiving in support of. sadly, that is rarely the case. >> i was the chairman of the nrc. my son was entering high school. we made the decision not to move here to not disruptive. we left him in the school he was in. that means my husband during the week did everything. as much as i could, i went home every weekend. i did not participate in the washington social scene all the time. but we felt it was important to do the
at the biggest foreign policy events of the year. >> i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay. i went down to the liberal party. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought it was acucute. she asked me why and i made an early case for lindsey and i made the case against his opponent. she handed me a box of pastry. i took a back to headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics and i was told you can keep the money. >> david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. fall by the all women delegation of new hampshire. then growing up in the white house. tonight on c-span. >> there was a forum on women in leadership. hilda solis spoke about her career and serving in the obama administration. >> good morning. they come from los angeles and cleveland and baltimore. poor and white. each of them have one thing in common. they are all successful. each rose to the top of their field in the arts or politics or sports. we will talk
country as great as it is. that foreign policy record we have is something to be proud of. that is not to say we should be putting boots on the ground or putting our men and women in harm's way but i think we do have an opportunity, or at least, you know, a chance to start to comprise some policies that could help steer syria out of this and also we obviously need to be worrying about iran, its nuclear program and its meddling in the politics and policies of some of our allies in the region. jamie: i'm not exaggerating, but sometimes i lock my door at night i think about iran. it is so scary. if people don't follow it they should. we're a little stretched now in the united states. we have boots on the ground and we have a lot of other things. it is very difficult to get intel on iran. they are surely fueling syria and all the violence that's going on there. even russia has been a bit hands off. what could we do? >> well, you know, first of all, iran's fingerprints are all over syria. i think that is undeniable. they continue to help the syrians crack down on this insurrect
want to introduce herb. she has her own show on them as nbc. she covers foreign-policy for the network. she is one of the bust respected and we are delighted she is here. next to her is surely an jackson. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 196
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9